DERBYSHIRE HORTICULTURAL ASSOCIATION



Down to earth advice for Derbyshire’s Gardeners - September

This is the ideal time to divide herbaceous perennials and collect and sow seed from perennials and hardy annuals.

Traditionally September is the time you should be assessing your lawn and formulating a plan carrying out any major renovations or improvements in the autumn. Depending on how uneven your lawn is a number of solutions can be used ranging from top-dressing over a number of seasons to adjust the level to lifting the turf and re laying it once you have adjusted the levels by adding or removing soil.

Lawn Disease - In the autumn and the summer you should keep a close eye on your lawn checking it every few days for areas that turn yellow red as this is often the first signs of a fungal disease such as Red Thread. Damaged Areas or Patches These areas can be re-turfed or re seeded September and October Rough or Weed Grasses in your Lawn Often in a lawn with fine grasses you will find a patch of rougher grass such as Yorkshire fog or rye grass. The best solution is to remove these areas and reseed or re turf.

Divide herbaceous perennials. Collect and sow seed from perennials and hardy annuals.

Traditionally September is the time you should be assessing your lawn and formulating a plan carrying out any major renovations or improvements in the autumn. Depending on how uneven your lawn is a number of solutions can be used ranging from top-dressing over a number of seasons to adjust the level to lifting the turf and re laying it once you have adjusted the levels by adding or removing soil.

Finish tying in wall-trained sweet cherries. Pruning should have been completed during the summer. Water any new strawberry beds planted this season. New plants need to establish before the cold sets in.

Celery and leeks can be earthed-up for the final time this month, leaving just a tuft of foliage sticking out of the trench or collar in order to blanch the stems.

Keep up with watering of freshly planted plants, using rain or grey water if possible. Take semi-ripe cuttings of evergreen shrubs such as Cistus, Ceanothus and Viburnum. Take hardwood cuttings of roses, choosing well-ripened, healthy shoots. Give evergreen hedges a final trim to make sure they are in shape for winter.

Try to plant daffodils (Narcissus) by mid-September for the best results. Tulips are best left until November. Remember that there are many other bulbs to choose from: Muscari (grape hyacinths), Chionodoxa (glory of the snow), Scilla, Ipheion and crocuses are all possibilities among many others.

Bring inside any tender perennials, such as Fuchsia, Gazania, Lantana and Abutilon, before frosts cause damage. Wait for the first frosts to hit dahlias and cannas before lifting the tubers or rhizomes. Buy spring-flowering bedding plants, such as Bellis, Primula, wallflowers, and violas .

Continue to deadhead plants such as Dahlia, Delphinium, Rosa and Penstemon to prolong the display and give colour well into the month. If the weather is already autumnal, you can now plant and move shrubs and trees without having to worry excessively about their survival and establishment. Shrubs planted now will get off to a flying start next spring, as they will have had all winter to settle in.

Finally, deadhead roses and use composted green waste as a mulch. Net ponds before leaf fall gets underway. Turn/moisten compost heap/bin. 

Why not pay a visit to one of the many produce shows held throughout Derbyshire in September?

 






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